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CAM #4 Los Angeles-Salt Lake City

April 17, 1926: Los Angeles CA-Salt Lake City UT; interim stop: Las Vegas NV; awarded: Western Air Express, Inc.  Douglas M-2  CAM #4 Covers

 

CAM #4 Airways (Airways are based South to North and West to East)

United States Congressional serial set. 9509. page 89; Contract for Mail Service, Route No. C.A.M 4; Contract made 7th day of October 1925 to Western Air Express (Inc.); Route Salt Lake City, Utah, by Las Vegas, Nevada, to Los Angeles California and return.

 

Aviation and Aircraft Journal. Vol. 10, No. 13, March 28, 1921, page 406

Los-Angeles-Salt Lake Airway
Suitable landing fields and supply bases are distrubuted along the Los Angeles-Salt Lake airlane to afford safe travel for the mail carrying government airplanes, according to announcement by Secretary George Harrison of the Aero Club of Los Angeles. The route for the promised transcontinental air mail service is in readiness whenever the government gives the order for the western terminal of the transcontinetal service to be transferred to the more favorable southern route.

Aeronautical Bulletin No. 92, Route Information Series (Los Angeles-Las Vegas), January 15, 1924

Aeronautical Bulletin No. 93, Route Information Series (Las Vegas-Milford), January 15, 1924

Aeronautical Bulletin No. 94, Route Information Series (Milford-Salt Lake), January 15, 1924

Air Commerce Bulletin Vol. 4, No.  , 1932 page 580

List of blinker beacon locations on route.

Air commerce Bulletin Vol. 1, No. 14, 1932 page 16

Windmill, Calif.  (LA-SL) The notice with reference to the intermediate landing field formerly in operation at Windmill, carried in Air Commerce Bulletin No. 6, should have read:  "This field has been discontinued and should not be used in the future, as the field surface has been destroyed by a cloudburst.  Field bouncary lights have been extinquished, but the beacon will remain in operation."

Air Commerce Bulletin Vol. 3, No. 1, July 1, 1931, 1931 page 12

Las Vegas, Nev.  (LA-SL Site No. 25):  a 24-inch, 1,000,000 candlepower beacon light showing 6 revolutions per minute is in operation 17 miles northeast of Las Vegas. adjacent to United States Highway No. 91, and close to the tracks of the Los Angeles & Salt Lake Railway; latitude, 36° 20'; longitude, 115° 00'.  Two red course lights show characteristic:  Dash, dot, dot (_..).  This installation located on top of a small hill in the pass.  A power house painted yellow and black 550 feet northwest at the base of the hill.

Air Commerce Bulletin Vol 4., No. 7, October 1, 1932,  page 184

Daggett, Calif. (LA-SL Site No. 12):  The 24-inch clear rotating airway beacon light formerly operating airway beacon light formerly operated by the Department of Commerce at Dagett, as an aid on the Los Angeles-Salt Lake airway, has been discontinued.
Helendale, Calif. (LA-SL Site No. 9): The 24-inch clear rotating airway beacon light, formerly operated by the Department of Commerce near Helendale as an aid on the Los Angeles-Salt Lake airway, has been discontinuued.
Lenwood, Calif. (LA-SL Site No. 10): The 24-inch clear rotating airway beacon light, formerly operated by the Department of Commerce one-half mile south of Lenwood as an aid on the Los Angeles-Salt Lake airway, has been discontinuued.
Victorville, Calif. (LA-SL Site No. 8): The 24-inch clear rotating airway beacon light, formerly operated by the Department of Commerce 1 mile south  of Victorville as an aid on the Los Angeles-Salt Lake airway, has been discontinuued.

Air Commerce Bulletin Vol. 3, No. 9, November 2, 1931 page 239

Los Angeles-Daggett, Calif. (LA-A Sites Nos. 2 to 10B, inc.)  Due to the intersection of the Los Angeles-Salt Lake and the Los Angeles-Amarillo airways, sites Nos. 2, 3, 4, 5A, 53 Mile Blinker, 5B, 5C, 5D, 6, 7, 9, 10A and 10B, formerly carried on the Los Angeles-Salt Lake Airway, have been redesignated as on the Los Angeles-Amarillo Airway.

U.S. Navigation Chart No.
U.S. Navigation Chart No.
CAM # 1  |  CAM # 2  |  CAM # 3  |  CAM # 4  |  CAM # 5  |  CAM # 6  |  CAM # 7  |  CAM # 8  | CAM # 9  | CAM # 10
CAM #11  |  CAM #12  |  CAM #13  |  CAM #14  |  CAM #15  |  CAM #16  |  CAM #17  |  CAM #18  | CAM #19  | CAM #20
CAM #21  |  CAM #22  |  CAM #23  |  CAM #24  |  CAM #25  |  CAM #26  |  CAM #27  |  CAM #28  | CAM #29  | CAM #30
CAM #31 CAM #32  |  CAM #33  |  CAM # 34